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Introduction

SMS – Building a safety culturesir-charles-kingsford-smith

Safety Management Systems do not produce income – they prevent having to spend it. It is an investment in the long term health of an organisation that produces efficiency and safety. When these outcomes are met, the operation excels in every way.

The course objectives are to show you what an SMS means, how to set up an SMS, and what is available to help you.  By following the main menu and using the links in the pages, the student will gain an understanding of;

  • How SMS has evolved
  • The link between ICAO and Australia/NZ’s commitment to SMS in aviation
  • The SMS framework – the components and elements of SMS
  • The integration of Human Factors into SMS and the importance of safety culture
  • How to set up a SMS using free and existing resources
  • Mapping SMS entry control against legislative compliance requirements
  • Practical application of SMS concepts
  • Safety leadership and current safety issues consideration

We’ve come a long way since Louis Bleriot first crossing the English Channel  in 1909!

bleriot02

… Blériot’s manager and great friend, Alfred Leblanc, started the 25-horsepower engine of his frail-looking mechanical dragonfly. The plane, still caked in mud from its last flight and looking very weather-beaten, instantly came to life and now the intrepid pilot, dressed in the blue overalls of the French workman, replete with oil stains, adjusted his goggles and did up his top button. Blériot had just one last question for Leblanc, and he shouted it over the sound of the engine… ‘Au fait, ou est-ce exactement, Douvres?‘ (By the way, where exactly is Dover?) …Leblanc pointed rather vaguely over the misty waters in a more or less north-westerly direction, and with that Blériot gave the order: ‘Laissez aller!’ (Let ‘er rip!)

Exert from Charles Kingsford Smith And Those Magnificent Men by Peter Fitzsimons

 

 The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) sets the standard for aviation safety management. ICAO member states such as Australia must ensure operators implement an acceptable safety management system.

The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) sets the standard for aviation safety management. ICAO member states such as Australia/NZ must ensure operators implement an acceptable safety management system.
Australia has committed to following ICAO recommendations with respect to SMS. Under the new Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, Australian and New Zealand aviation will be required to implement SMS and integrate Human Factors into their organisations

Course schedule

In essence the breakdown of the course is;

  • Day 1 – basics and background of SMS
  • Day 2 – theory and structure of SMS
  • Day 3 – building, implementing and practising SMS
  • Day 4 – building, implementing and practising SMS
  • Day 5 – higher concepts of SMS

The detailed schedule is as follows

Day one

Session

Content

Timing

1

Introduction greeting and admin

0830 – 0845

2

History and reason for SMS

0845 – 0910

3

Safety fundamentals

0910 – 1000

Morning Tea

1000 – 1020

4

SMS Context

1020 – 1130

5

ICAO and CASA

1140 – 1230

Lunch break

1230 – 1330

6

Safety Culture and Human Factors

1330 – 1640

Conclusion day one

1640 – 1650

Day two

Session

Content

Timing

7

er

0830– 0900

8

Exercise 1 – HF, Safety Culture, SHELL model – Kegworth air disastSMS

0900– 1030

Morning Tea

1030 – 1040

9

SMS Component 1- Safety Policy Objectives and planning

1040 – 1200

10

SMS Component 2 – Safety Risk Management

1200 – 1230

Lunch break

1230 – 1330

11

SMS Component 3 – Safety Assurance

1330 – 1430

12

SMS Compliance 4 – Safety Promotion

1430 – 1510

13

Exercise 1 and 2 – implementation exercise and Gap analysis exercise

1510 – 1600

Conclusion and summary

1600 – 1630

 

Day three

Session

Content

Timing

14

SMS Review 1

0800 – 0840

15

Building SMS Component 1

0840 – 0920

16

Building SMS Component 2

0920 – 1000

Morning Tea

1000 – 1020

17

Building SMS Component 3 and Component 4

1020 – 1100

18

FDAP and using Integrated IT solutions in SMS

1100 – 1230

Lunch break

1230 – 1330

19

Building the SMS manual

1330 – 1430

20

SMS Compliance and compliance exercise

1430 – 1500

21

Resources

1500 – 1600

Conclusion and summary

1600 – 1630

Day four

Session

Content

Timing

22

Review and discussion

0800 – 0840

23

Safety Risk Management application

0840 – 0920

24

Risk management plan exercise

0920 – 1000

Morning Tea

1000 – 1020

25

Risk management plan exercise continued

1020 – 1100

26

Report form exercise and discussion

1100 – 1200

Lunch break

1200 – 1300

27

Safety investigation exercise

1300 – 1430

28

Management of change exercise

1430 – 1500

29

Continuous improvement exercise

1500 – 1600

Conclusion and summary

1600 – 1630

Day five

Session

Content

Timing

30

Review and discussion

0830– 0900

31

Safety leadership

0900– 1030

Morning Tea

1030– 1045

32

Current safety issues

1045– 11345

33

Complex safety systems

1145– 1230

Lunch break

1230– 1300

34

Your SMS – a case study

1300 – 1400

35

Diploma accreditation

1400 – 1430

36

Assessment booklet

1430– 1500

Conclusion and critique

1500– 1530

Note:

  • 30 Minute break for morning and afternoon tea
  • One hour break for lunch
  • Timing subject to flexibility and class negotiation

Click here for Two Day Management SMS course

Air Nelson SMS training day

Christchurch International Airport Limited